A Spanner in the Cosmological Works

One of the basic assumptions in Einstein’s relativity is that the laws of physics are constant throughout the Universe. One of those laws is gravity, and an odd thing about gravity is that matter always attracts other matter, so why doesn’t everything simply collapse and fall to one gigantic mass? Einstein “explained” that with a “cosmological constant” which was really an ad hoc term put there to stop that happening. Then in 1927 Georges Lemaȋtre, a Belgian priest proposed that the Universe started off as a tiny incredibly condensed state that expanded, and is still expanding –  the so-called “Big Bang”. Hubble then found that on a sufficiently large scale, everything is moving away from the rest, and it was possible to extrapolate back in time to see when it all started. This was not universally agreed until the cosmic microwave background, which is required by this theory, was detected, and detected more or less in the required form. All was well, until eventually, three “problems” were perceived to arise: the “Horizon problem”, the “Flatness problem”, and the “Magnetic monopole problem”.

The Horizon problem is that on a sufficiently large scale, everything looks the same. The problem is, things are moving away from each other at such great distances, so how did they come into thermal equilibrium when there was no contact between them? I must confess I do not understand this. If the initial mass is a ball of uniform but incredibly dense energy, then if it is uniform, and if the expansion is uniform, everything that happens follows common rate equations, so to get the large-scale uniformity, all you need is the uniform expansion of the energy and a common clock. If particle A wants to decay, surely it does not have to get permission from the other side of the Universe. The flatness problem is that the Universe seems to behave as if it followed Euclidean geometry. In the cosmological models, this requires a certain specific particle density. The problem is, out of all the densities, why is it more or less exactly right? Is this reasoning circular, bearing in mind the models were constructed to give what we see? The cosmic microwave background is a strong indication that Euclidean geometry is correct, but maybe there are other models that might give this result with less difficulties. Finally, the magnetic monopole problem is we cannot find magnetic monopoles. In this context, so far all electromagnetism is in accord with Maxwell’s electromagnetic theory and its equations exclude magnetic monopoles. Maybe we can’t find them because the enthusiasts who argue they should be there are wrong.

Anyway, around 1980, Alan Guth introduced a theory called inflation that would “solve” these problems. In this, within 10^-36 seconds after the big bang (that is 1 second of time divided by10 multiplied by itself 36 times) the Universe made a crazy expansion from almost no volume to something approaching what we see now by 10^-32 seconds after the big bang, then everything slowed down and we get what we have now – a tolerably slowly expanding Universe but with quantum fluctuations that led to the galaxies, etc that we see today. This theory “does away” with these problems. Mind you, not everyone agrees. The mathematician Roger Penrose has pointed out that this inflation requires extremely specific initial conditions, so not only has this moved the problem, but it made it worse. Further, getting a flat universe with these mathematics is extremely improbable. Oops.

So, to the spanner. Scientists from UNSW Sydney reported that measurements on light from a quasar 13 billion light years away found that the fine structure constant was, er, not exactly constant. The fine structure constant α is

α=e2/2εoch

The terms are e the elementary electric charge, εo is the permittivity of free space, c is the sped of light, and h is Planck’s constant, or the quantum of action. If you don’t understand the details, don’t worry. The key point is α is a number (a shade over 137) and is a ratio of the most important constants in electromagnetic theory. If that is not constant, it means all of fundamental physics is not constant.  No only that, but in one direction, the strength of the electric force appeared to increase, but in the opposite direction, decrease. Not only that but a team in the US made observations about Xrays from distant galaxies, and found directionality as well, and even more interesting, their directional axis was essentially the same as the Australian findings. That appears to mean the Universe is dipolar, which means the basic assumption underpinning relativity is not exactly correct, while all those mathematical gymnastics to explain some difficult “problems” such as the horizon problem are irrelevant because they have concluded how something occurred that actually didn’t. Given that enthusiasts do not give up easily I expect soon there will be a deluge of papers explaining why it had tp be dipolar.

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2 thoughts on “A Spanner in the Cosmological Works

    • Yes, the xrays I mentioned in the last para presumably came from the same report you quoted. The important point is both independent studies had the same anisotropy. Good that you noticed the xray study.

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