Burying Carbon Dioxide, or Burying Cash?

In the last post, I expressed my doubt about the supply of metals for electric batteries. There is an alternative to giving up things that produce CO2 and that is to trap and sequester CO2. The idea is that for power stations the flu gases have the CO2 removed and pumped underground. That raises the question, how realistic is this? Chemistry World has an article that casts doubt, in my mind, that this can work. First, the size of the problem. One company aims to install 70 such plants, each capable of sequestering 1 million t of CO2. If these are actually realized, we almost reach 0.2% of what is required. Oops. Basically, we need to remove at least 1 billion t/a to stand still. This problem is large. There is also the problem of how we do it.

The simplest way is to pass the flu gases through amine solvents, with monoethanolamine the most common absorbent used. Leaving aside the problem of getting enough amine, which requires a major expansion of the chemical manufacturing industry, what happens is the amine absorbs CO2 and makes the amine carbonate, and the CO2 is recovered by heating the carbonate and regenerating the amine. However, the regeneration will never be perfect and there are losses. Leaving aside finding the raw materials actually synthesizing the amine takes about 0.8 MWh of energy, the inevitable losses mean we need up to 240 MWh every year to run a million tonne plant. We then need heat to decompose the amine carbonate, and that requires about 1 MWh per tonne of CO2 absorbed. Finally, we need a little less than 0.12 MWh per tonne of CO2 to compress it, transport it and inject it into the ground. If we wanted to inject 1 billion t of CO2, we need to generate something like 840 TWh of electricity. That is a lot of electricity.

We can do a little better with things called metal organic frameworks (MOFs).These can be made with a high surface energy to absorb CO2 and since they do not form strong chemical bonds the CO2 can be recovered at temperatures in the vicinity of  80 – 100 degrees C, which opens the possibility of using waste heat from power stations. That lowers the energy cost quite a bit. Without the waste heat the energy requirement is still significant, about half that of the amines. The comes the sting – the waste heat approach still leaves about 60% of what was absorbed, so it is not clear the waste heat has saved much. The addition of an extra step is also very expensive.

The CO2 content of effluent gases is between 4 – 15%; for ordinary air it is 0.04%, which makes it very much more difficult to capture. One proposal is to capture CO2 by bubbling air through a solution of potassium hydroxide, and then evaporating off the water and heating the potassium carbonate to decomposition temperature, which happens to be about 1200 degrees C. One might have thought that calcium oxide might be easier, which pyrolyses about 600 degrees C, but what do I know? This pyrolysis takes about 2.4 MWh per tonne of CO2, and if implemented, this pyrolysis route that absorbs CO2 from the air would require about 1.53 TWh of electricity per year for sequestering 1 million t of CO2.

When you need terawatt hours of electricity to run a plant capable of sequestering one million tonne of CO2, and you need to sequester a billion t, it becomes clear that this is going to take an awful lot of energy. That costs a lot money. In the UK, electricity costs between £35 – 65 per MWh, and we have been talking in terms of a million times that per plant. Who pays? Note this scheme has NO income stream; it sells nothing, so we have to assume it will be charged to the taxpayer. Lucky taxpayer!

One small-scale effort in Iceland offers a suggested route. It is not clear how they capture the CO2, but then they dissolve it in water and inject that into basalt, where the carbonic acid reacts with the olivine-type structures to make carbonates, where it is fixed indefinitely. That suggests that provided the concentration of CO2 is high enough, using pressure to dissolve it in water might be sufficient. That would dramatically lower the costs. Of course, the alternative is to crush the basalt and spread it in farmland, instead of lime. My preferred option to remove CO2 from the air is to grow plants. They work for free at the low concentrations. Further, if we select seaweed, we get the added benefit of improving the ecology for marine life. But that requires us to do something with the plants, or the seaweed. Which means more thinking and research. The benefit, though, is the scheme could at least earn revenue. The alternatives are to bankrupt the world or find some other way of solving this problem.

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