Martian Fluvial Flows, Placid and Catastrophic

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Despite the fact that, apart localized dust surfaces in summer, the surface of Mars has had average temperatures that never exceeded about minus 50 degrees C over its lifetime, it also has had some quite unexpected fluid systems. One of the longest river systems starts in several places at approximately 60 degrees south in the highlands, nominally one of the coldest spots on Mars, and drains into Argyre, thence to the Holden and Ladon Valles, then stops and apparently dropped massive amounts of ice in the Margaritifer Valles, which are at considerably lower altitude and just north of the equator. Why does a river start at one of the coldest places on Mars, and freeze out at one of the warmest? There is evidence of ice having been in the fluid, which means the fluid must have been water. (Water is extremely unusual in that the solid, ice, floats in the liquid.) These fluid systems flowed, although not necessarily continuously, for a period of about 300 million years, then stopped entirely, although there are other regions where fluid flows probably occurred later. To the northeast of Hellas (the deepest impact crater on Mars) the Dao and Harmakhis Valles change from prominent and sharp channels to diminished and muted flows at –5.8 k altitude that resemble terrestrial marine channels beyond river mouths.

So, how did the water melt? For the Dao and Harmakhis, the Hadriaca Patera (volcano) was active at the time, so some volcanic heat was probably available, but that would not apply to the systems starting in the southern highlands.

After a prolonged period in which nothing much happened, there were catastrophic flows that continued for up to 2000 km forming channels up to 200 km wide, which would require flows of approximately 100,000,000 cubic meters/sec. For most of those flows, there is no obvious source of heat. Only ice could provide the volume, but how could so much ice melt with no significant heat source, be held without re-freezing, then be released suddenly and explosively? There is no sign of significant volcanic activity, although minor activity would not be seen. Where would the water come from? Many of the catastrophic flows start from the Margaritifer Chaos, so the source of the water could reasonably be the earlier river flows.

There was plenty of volcanic activity about four billion years ago. Water and gases would be thrown into the atmosphere, and the water would ice/snow out predominantly in the coldest regions. That gets water to the southern highlands, and to the highlands east of Hellas. There may also be geologic deposits of water. The key now is the atmosphere. What was it? Most people say it was carbon dioxide and water, because that is what modern volcanoes on Earth give off, but the mechanism I suggested in my “Planetary Formation and Biogenesis” was the gases originally would be reduced, that is mainly methane and ammonia. The methane would provide some sort of greenhouse effect, but ammonia on contact with ice at minus 80 degrees C or above, dissolves in the ice and makes an ammonia/water solution. This, I propose, was the fluid. As the fluid goes north, winds and warmer temperatures would drive off some of the ammonia so oddly enough, as the fluid gets warmer, ice starts to freeze. Ammonia in the air will go and melt more snow. (This is not all that happens, but it should happen.)  Eventually, the ammonia has gone, and the water sinks into the ground where it freezes out into a massive buried ice sheet.

If so, we can now see where the catastrophic flows come from. We have the ice deposits where required. We now require at least fumaroles to be generated underneath the ice. The Margaritifer Chaos is within plausible distance of major volcanism, and of tectonic activity (near the mouth of the Valles Marineris system). Now, let us suppose the gases emerge. Methane immediately forms clathrates with the ice (enters the ice structure and sits there), because of the pressure. The ammonia dissolves ice and forms a small puddle below. This keeps going over time, but as it does, the amount of water increases and the amount of ice decreases. Eventually, there comes a point where there is insufficient ice to hold the methane, and pressure builds up until the whole system ruptures and the mass of fluid pours out. With the pressure gone, the remaining ice clathrates start breaking up explosively. Erosion is caused not only by the fluid, but by exploding ice.

The point then is, is there any evidence for this? The answer is, so far, no. However, if this mechanism is correct, there is more to the story. The methane will be oxidised in the atmosphere to carbon dioxide by solar radiation and water. Ammonia and carbon dioxide will combine and form ammonium carbonate, then urea. So if this is true, we expect to find buried where there had been water, deposits of urea, or whatever it converted to over three billion years. (Very slow chemical reactions are essentially unknown – chemists do not have the patience to do experiments over millions of years, let alone billions!) There is one further possibility. Certain metal ions complex with ammonia to form ammines, which dissolve in water or ammonia fluid. These would sink underground, and if the metal ions were there, so might be the remains of the ammines now. So we have to go to Mars and dig.

 

 

 

 

 

Geoengineering: Shade the World

As you may have noticed when not concerned about a certain virus, global warming has not gone away. The virus did some good. I live on a hill and can look down on some roads, and during our lock-down the roads were strangely empty. Some people seemed to think we had found the answer to global warming, as much less petrol was bing burnt, but the fact is, even if nobody drove we were still producing net amounts of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, and even if we were not doing that, the amounts currently in the air are still out of equilibrium and would continue to melt ice and lead to high temperatures. In the northern hemisphere now you have a summer so maybe you notice.

So, what can we do? One proposal is to shade the Earth’s surface. The idea is that if you can reflect more incoming solar radiation back to space there is less energy on the surface and . . .  Yes, it is the ‘and’ wherein lies the difficulties. We get less radiation striking the surface, so we cool the surface, but then what? According to one paper recently published in Geophysical Research Letters (https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2020GL087348 ) the answer is not good news. They have produced simulations of models, and focus on what are called storm tracks, which are relatively narrow zones in oceans where storms such as tropical cyclones and mid-latitude cyclones travel through prevailing winds. Such geoengineering, according to the models, would weaken these storms. Exactly why this is bad eludes me. I would have thought lower energy storms would be good; why do we want hundreds of thousands of citizens have their properties leveled by hurricanes, typhoons, or simply tropical cyclones as they are known in the Southern Hemisphere? This weakening happens through a smaller pole to equator temperature difference because most of the light reflected is over the tropics. Storms are heat engines at work, and the greater the temperature difference, the more force can be generated. The second law of thermodynamics at work. Fine. We are cooling the surface, and while it may seem that we are ignoring the ice melting of the polar regions, we are not because most of the heat comes from ocean currents, and they are heated by the tropics.

More examples: we would reduce wind extremes in midlatitudes, possibly lead to less efficient ventilation of air pollution, may possibly decrease low cloud cover the storm‐track regions and weaken poleward energy transport. In short, a reasonable amount of that is what we want to do anyway. It is also claimed we would get increased heat waves. I find that suspicious, given that less heat is available. It is claimed that such activities would alter the climate. Yes, but that is what we would be trying to do, namely alter it from what it might have been. It is also claimed that the models show there could possibly  be regional reductions in rainfall. Perhaps, but that sort of thing is happening anyway. Australia had dreadful bushfires this year. I gather forest fires were going well in North America also.

One aspect of this type of study that bothers me is it is all based on models. The words like ‘may’, ‘could’ and ‘possibly’ turn up frequently. That, to me, indicates the modelers don’t actually have a lot of confidence in their models. The second thing that bothers me is they have not looked at nature. Consider the data from Travis et al.(2002) Nature 418, 601.  For the three days 11-14 Sept. 2001 the average diurnal temperature ranges averaged from 4000 weather stations across the US increased on average 1.1 degrees C above the average from 1971 – 2000, with the highest temperatures on the 14th. They were on average 1.8 degrees C greater than the average for the two adjacent three-day periods. The three days with the increase were, of course, the days when all US aircraft were grounded and there were no jet contrails. Notice that this is the difference between day and night; at night the contrails retain heat better, while in daytime they reflect sunlight.  Unfortunately, what was not stated in the paper was what the temperatures were. One argument is that models show while the contrails reflect more light during the day, they keep in more heat during the night. Instead of calculations, why not show the actual data?

The second piece of information is that the eruption of Mount Pinatubo sent aerosols into the atmosphere and for about a year the average global temperature dropped 1 degree C. Most of that ash was at low latitudes in the northern hemisphere. There are weather reports from this period so that should give clues as to what would happen if we tried this geoengineering. This overall cooling was real and the world economies did not come to an end. The data from that could contribute to addressing the unkn owns.

So, what is the answer? In my opinion, the only real answer is to try it out for a short period and see what happens. Once the outcomes are evaluated we can then decide what to do. The advantage of sending dust into the stratosphere is it does not stay there. If it does not turn out well, it will not be worse than what volcanoes do anyway. The disadvantage is to be effective we have to keep doing it. Maybe from various points of view it is a bad idea, but let us make up our minds from evaluating proper information and not rely on models that are no better than the assumptions used. Which choice we make should be based on data, not on emotion.

Scientific Discoveries, How to Make Them, and COVID 19

An interesting problem for a scientist is how to discover something? The mediocre, of course, never even try to solve this while it is probably only a small percentage that gets there. Basically, it is done by observing clues then using logic to interpret them. The method is called induction, and it can lead to erroneous conclusions. Aristotle worked put how to do it, and then dropped the ball at least twice in his two biggest blunders when he forgot to follow his own advice. (In fairness, he probably made his blunders before he worked put his methodology, and lost interest in correcting them. The Physica was one of his earliest works.) 

The clues come from nature, and picking them up relies on keeping eyes open and more importantly, the mind open. The first step is to seek patterns in what you observe, and try to correlate your observations. The key here is Aristotle’s comment that the whole is more than the sum of the parts. That looks like New Age nonsense, but look at it from the mathematics of set theory. A set is simply a collection of data, usually expressed as numbers, but not anything should go into it. As an example, I could list all green things I can see, but that would be pointless. I could list all plants, and now I am making progress into botany. The point is, the set comprises all the elements inside it, together with the rule that conveys set membership. It is the rule that we seek if we wish to make a discovery and in effect we have to guess it by examining the data. This process is called induction, and if we get some true statements, we can move on to deduction. 

There are, of course, problems. Thus we could say:

All plants have chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is green

Therefore all plants are green.

That is untrue. The chlorophyll will be green, but the plant may have additional dyes/pigments. An obvious case is red seaweed. The problem here is the lazy “therefore”. Usually it is somewhat more difficult, especially in medicine.

Which, naturally in these times, it brings me to COVID-19. What we find is very young people, especially girls, are more or less untroubled. The old have a lot more trouble, and, it turns out more so old men. Now part of the trouble will be that the old have weaker immune systems, and often other weaknesses in their bodies. Unlike wine, age does not improve the body. That is probably a confusing observation, because it leads nowhere and is somewhat obvious.

Anyway, we have a new observation: if we restrict ourselves to severe cases in hospitals, there is a serious excess of bald men. Now, a correlation is not causative, and trying to work out the cause can be fraught with difficulty. In this case, we can immediately dismiss the idea that hair has anything to do with it. However, baldness is also correlated with higher levels of androgens, which are male sex hormones. It was also found that the severe cases in males also usually had high levels of androgens. By itself, we can show this is not a cause either.

So, this leads to a deeper investigation, and it is found that the virus uses an enzyme called TMPRSS2 to cleave the Sars-Cov-2 spike protein, and this permits the cleaved spike to attack the ACE2 receptors on the patient’s cells, and thus permit the viral RNA to enter the cell and begin replicating. What the androgens do is to activate a gene in the virus that expresses TMPRSS2, so what the androgens do is to increase the amount of enzyme necessary to attack a cell. This suggests as a treatment something that will inhibit the viral gene so no TMPRSS2 is expressed. We await developments. (Suppressing androgens in men is not a good idea – they start to grow breasts. However, it also suggests that ACE inhibitors, used to reduce hypertension, might offer some assistance.) Now, the value of a theory can be shown by whether it helps explains something else. In this case, it argues that since pre-puberty children should be more resistant, and girls keep this benefit longer. That is found. It does not prove we are correct, but it is comforting. That is an example of induced science. Induction does not necessarily produce the truth, and conclusions can be wrong. We find out by pursuing the consequences, and either finding we have discovered something, or go back to the drawing board.

The Fermi Paradox: Where are the Aliens?

This question, as much as anything, illustrates why people have trouble thinking through problems when they cannot put their own self-importance to one side. Let us look at this problem not from our point of view.

The Fermi paradox is a statement that since there are so many stars, most of which probably have planets, and a reasonable number of them have life, more than half of those are likely to have been around longer than us and so should be more technically advanced, but we have seen no clue as to their presence. Why not? That question begs the obvious counter: why should we? First, while the number of planets is huge, most of them are in other galaxies, and of those in the Milky Way, stars are very well-separated. The nearest, Alpha Centauri, is a three star system: two rather close stars (A G-type star like our sun and a K1 star) and a more distant red dwarf, and these are 4.37 light years away. The two have distances that vary between 35.6 AU to 11.2 AU, i.e. on closest approach they come a little further apart than Saturn and the sun.  That close approach means that planets corresponding to our giants could not exist in stable orbits, and astronomers are fairly confident there are no giants closer to the star. Proxima Centauri has one planet in the habitable zone, but for those familiar with my ebook “Planetary Formation and Biogenesis” will know that in my opinion, the prospect for life originating there, or around most Red Dwarfs, is extremely low. So, could there be Earth-like planets around the two larger stars? Maybe, but our technology cannot find them. As it happens, if there were aliens there, they could not detect Earth with technology at our level either.  Since most stars are immensely further away, rocky planets are difficult to discover. We have found exoplanets, but they are generally giants, planets around M stars, or planets that inadvertently have their orbital planes aligned so we can see eclipses.

This is relevant, because if we are seeking a signal from another civilization, as Seti seeks, then either the signal is deliberate or accidental. An example of accidental is the electromagnetic radiation we send into space through radio and TV signals. According to tvtechnology.com “An average large transmitter transmits about 8kW per multiplex.” That will give “acceptable signal strength” over, say, 50 km. The signal strength attenuates according to the square of the distance, so while the signals will get to Alpha Centauri, they will be extremely weak, and because of bandwidth issues, broadcasts from well separated transmitters will interfere with each other. Weak signals can be amplified, but aliens at Alpha Centauri would get extremely faint noise that might be assignable to technology. 

Suppose you want to send a deliberate signal? Now, you want to boost the power, and the easiest way to get over the inverse square attenuation is to focus the signal. Now, however, you need to know exactly where the intended recipient will be. You might do this for one of your space ships, in which case you would send a slightly broader signal on a very high power level at an agreed frequency but as a short burst. To accidentally detect this, because you have a huge range of frequencies to monitor, you have to accidentally be on that frequency at the time of the burst. There is some chance of Seti detecting such a signal if the space ship was heading to Earth, but then why listen for such a signal, as opposed to waiting for the ship.

The next possible deliberate signal would be aimed at us. To do that, they would need to know we had potential, but let us suppose they did. Suppose it takes something like 4.5 billion years to get technological life, and at that nice round number, they peppered Earth with signals. Oops! We are still in the Cretaceous. Such a move would require a huge power output so as to flood whatever we were using, a guess as to what frequencies we would find of interest, and big costs. Why would they do that, when it may take hundreds or thousands of years for a response? It makes little sense for any “person” to go to all that trouble and know they could never know whether it worked or not. We take the cheap option of listening with telescopes, but if everyone is listening, nobody is sending.

How do they choose a planet? My “Planetary Formation and Biogenesis” concludes you need a rocky planet with major felsic deposits, which is most probable around the G type star (but still much less than 50% of them). So you would need some composition data, and in principle you can get that from spectroscopy (but with much better technology than we have). What could you possibly see? Oxygen is obvious, except it gives poor signals. In the infrared spectra, you might detect ozone, and that would be definitive. You often see statements that methane should be detectable. Yes, but Titan has methane and no life. Very low levels of carbon dioxide is a strong indication, as it suggests large amounts of water to fix it, and plate tectonics to renew it. Obviously, signals from chlorophyll would be proof, but they are not exactly strong. So if they are at anything but the very closest stars they would not know whether we are here, so why waste that expense. The Government accountants would never fund such a project with such a low probability of getting a return on investment. Finally, suppose you decided a planet might have technology, why would you send a signal? As Hawking remarked, an alien species might decide this would be a good planet to eradicate all life and transform it suitable for the aliens to settle. You say that is unlikely, but with all those planets, it only needs one such race. So simple game theory suggests “Don’t do it!” If we assume they are more intelligent than us, they won’t transmit because there is no benefit for those transmitting.

Ebook Discount

From June 25 – July 2, my thriller, The Manganese Dilemma, will be discounted to 99c/99p on Amazon. 

The Russians did it; everyone is convinced of that. But just exactly what did they do? Charles Burrowes, a master hacker, is thrown into a ‘black op’ with the curvaceous Svetlana for company to validate new super stealth technology she has brought to the West. Some believe there is nothing there since their surveillance technology cannot show any evidence of it, but then it is “super stealth” so just maybe . . . Also, Svetlana’s father was shot dead as they made their escape. Can Burrowes provide what the CIA needs before Russian counterintelligence or a local criminal conspiracy blow the whole operation out of the water? The lives of many CIA agents in Russia will depend on how successful he is.

Energy from the Sea. A Difficult Environmental Choice.

If you have many problems and you are forced to do something, it makes sense to choose any option that solves more than one problem. So now, thanks to a certain virus, changes to our economic system will be forced on us, so why not do something about carbon emissions at the same time? The enthusiast will tell us science offers us a number of options, so let’s get on with it. The enthusiast trots out what supports his view, but what about what he does not say? Look at the following.

An assessment from the US Energy Information Administration states the world will use 21,000 TWh of electricity in 2020. According to the International Energy Agency, the waves in the world’s oceans store about 80,000 TWh. Of course much of that is, well, out at sea, but they estimate about 4,000 TWh could be harvested. While that is less than 20% of what is needed, it is still a huge amount. They are a little coy on how this could be done, though. Wave power depends on wave height (the amplitude of the wave) and how fast the waves are moving (the phase velocity). One point is that waves usually move to the coast, and there are many parts of the world where there are usually waves of reasonable amplitude so an energy source is there.

Ocean currents also have power, and the oceans are really one giant heat engine. One estimate claimed that 0.1% of the power of the Gulf Stream running along the East Coast of the US would be equivalent to 150 nuclear power stations. Yes, but the obvious problem is the cross-sectional area of the Gulf Stream. Enormous amounts of energy may be present, but the water is moving fairly slowly, so a huge area has to be trapped to get that energy. 

It is simpler to extract energy from tides, if you can find appropriate places. If a partial dam can be put across a narrow river mouth that has broad low-lying ground behind it, quite significant flows can be generated for most of the day. Further, unlike solar and wind power, tides are very predictable. Tides vary in amplitude, with a record apparently going to the Bay of Fundy in Canada: 15 meters in height.

So why don’t we use these forms of energy? Waves and tides are guaranteed renewable and we do not have to do anything to generate them. A surprising fraction of the population lives close to the sea, so transmission costs for them would be straightforward. Similarly, tidal power works well even at low water speeds because compared with wind, water is much denser, and the equipment lasts longer. La Rance, in France, has been operational since 1966. They also do not take up valuable agricultural land. On the other hand, they disturb sea life. A number of fish appear to use the Earth’s magnetic field to navigate and nobody knows if EMF emissions have an effect on marine life. Turbine blades most certainly will. They also tend to be needed near cities, which means they disturb fishing boats and commercial ships.

There are basically two problems. One is engineering. The sea is not a very forgiving place, and when storms come, the water has serious power. The history of wave power is littered with washed up structures, smashed to pieces in storms. Apparently an underwater turbine was put in the Bay of Fundy, but it lasted less than a month. There is a second technical problem: how to make electricity? The usual way would be to move wire through a magnetic field, which is the usual form of a generator/dynamo. The issue here is salt water must be kept completely out, which is less than easy. Since waves go up and down, an alternative is to have some sort of float that mechanically transmits the energy to a generator on shore. That can be made to work on a small scale, but it is less desirable on a larger scale.The second problem is financial. Since history is littered with failed attempts, investors get wary, and perhaps rightly so. There may be huge energies present, but they are dispersed over huge areas, which means power densities are low, and the economics usually become unattractive. Further, while the environmentalists plead for something like this, inevitably it will be, “Somewhere else, please. Not in my line of sight.” So, my guess is this is not a practical solution now or anytime in the reasonable future other than for small specialized efforts.

The Virus, and How Science Works, or Doesn’t

It may come as no particular surprise to hear that COVID-19 has become a source of fake news, conspiracy theories, whatever. Bill Gates was one victim. In various assertions, he created the virus, patented it, and was going to develop a vaccine and in it he would monitor people using quantum-dot spy software. Various forms got more likes, shares or comments on Facebook than most news items. Leaving aside the stupidity on view, what about facts? Nobody seems to have asked if he patented it, what is the patent number? Mike Pompeo alleged without a shred of evidence the virus originated in a Chinese laboratory. Political gain and nationalism sure beats truth as an objective there. According to Nature (581, 371-4) an academic subdiscipline has sprung up, tracking the false information, and studying how it is spread. The interesting thing about this is the observation that social-media are run to maximise user engagement and evidence-based information is way back in priorities. 

Also missing was an answer to the question, how does science work? If you watch certain TV shows, someone carries out some weird mathematics on a blackboard, and hey, we have it. It isn’t like that. Apart from a few academics that like to generate papers to keep up their publications, and for people applying standard theory (for example, NASA sending a rocket to a site on Mars, and then it is not a trivial task for a genius on a blackboard) the usual problem is for a new problem where the answer is not known, we sift through the evidence, try to find relationships, use such a relationship to form a hypothesis, then design some method to test it on new situations.

COVID-19 became a problem because genuine information was scarce, in turn because nobody knew, but look what happened as shreds came to light. President Trump advocated an “unproven cure”. But who says? The general feeling seems to be to trust the experts with “good credentials” (the logic falacy ad verecundiam). Since about 1970 there have been hardly any debates, and the funding models of science have forced only too many to “get in behind”. As an example of where wheels fell off, think chloroquine and its hydroxy derivative. 

First, two quotes from Gao et al.Bioscience Trends, 14: 72-3. “results from more than 100 patients have demonstrated that chloroquine phosphate is superior to the control treatment in inhibiting the exacerbation of pneumonia, improving lung imaging findings, promoting a virus- negative conversion, and shortening the disease course according to the news briefing. Severe adverse reactions to chloroquine phosphate were not noted.” and “The drug is recommended for inclusion in the next version of the Guidelines for the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Pneumonia Caused by COVID-19 issued by the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China.” The Chinese issued a handbook that indicates how and when to use it. 

Then, from Gautret et al. DOI : 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2020.105949 Twenty cases were treated with hydroxychloroquine. Those who refused, and the cases at another centre were used as a control. Those treated “showed a significant reduction of the viral carriage at D6-post inclusion compared to controls, and much lower average carrying duration than reported of untreated patients in the literature. Azithromycin added to hydroxychloroquine was significantly more efficient for virus elimination.”  Yes, a small sample, and patients who were known to have an allergic reaction to the drug, or other strong contraindications were excluded from the study. There was a third French report of about 80 patients that showed similar good results. Those two papers cited are fairly clear. It does not mean that an iron-clad conclusion should be drawn, but it does suggest potential effectiveness. 

However, a paper was published in The Lancet, one of the most respected medical journals that used statistical analysis from data from 96,032 patients, some of whom were treated with these drugs, and concluded the drugs were not helpful and more likely to cause death. So that should settle it, right? When I read this, my initial reaction was, not so fast. Of those treated, approximately 15% had coronary heart disease, 6% other heart problems, about 14% diabetes, 30% hypertension, 31% hyperlipidaemia, 10% smoked, 17% formerly smoked. Thus 96% had something wrong with them before treatment and 27% smoked or had smoked. Of course, some would not have such problems; some would qualify in two or three categories. The control group had 81,144 patients, and overall, 11.1% died in hospital, with 9.3% in the control group. So treatment made things worse. Convinced?

Do you see a problem? First, the control group may well have had a large number of young people who had mild symptoms, which lowers the death rate, which, as an aside, is remarkably high. New Zealand had a death rate of 1.46%. Second, we have no data on how treatment was selected and carried out. But, you say, statistics do not lie. Actually, that is not true, at least if care is not taken. My first reaction was to think, Simpson’s paradox (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simpson%27s_paradox), which shows it is possible to get the opposite conclusion if there are confounding variables, and this is particularly troublesome in medical reports where such variables are all over the place. I had had discussions with friends previously where I expressed optimism for the hydroxychloroquine, based on the two papers cited above, then I expressed the “not so fast” view about The Lancet paper. Needless to say, friends thought I was simply refusing to accept the truth.

However, there have been further developments. The Editors of The Lancet published a brief comment stating that “Important scientific questions have been raised about data reported in the paper…” Shortly after a bombshell: (https://www.theguardian.com/world/202…) The data appeared to come from a small US company called Surgisphere, “whose handful of employees appear to include a science fiction writer and an adult-content model”. They refuse to explain their data or methodology. The Australian data came from hospitals that say they have never heard of Surgisphere, and worse, the casualties from the trials exceeded the total Australian casualties. It seems a case can be made that Surgisphere generated fake news, and it was published in two of the most respected medical journals (the other was New England Journal of Medicine).

Following these papers based on Surgisphere results, the WHO attempted to end the use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19, and a number of hospitals have complied and stopped using it. 

However, to add to the confusion the University of Oxford published this: “A total of 1542 patients were randomised to hydroxychloroquine and compared with 3132 patients randomised to usual care alone. There was no significant difference in the primary endpoint of 28-day mortality (25.7% hydroxychloroquine vs. 23.5% usual care” (http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2020-06-05-no-clinical-benefit-use-hydroxychloroquine-hospitalised-patients-covid-19). Now the University of Oxford should be a reliable source, and it clearly shows no benefit in this set of patients but my question still is, how was this set selected? The trial will be randomized, but the overall death rate of 23.5% in “usual care” seems to signal this is a selected set. (Recall the NZ death rate of 1.46%; our doctors are good, but I would not expect them to be that superior to the University of Oxford, so is something else going on?)

So what is going on? I have no idea. My guess is that the chloroquine and hydroxy-derivative do convey benefit to some patients, but not all, and/or they convey benefit but only if some other variable is present. In this context, there is one proposal that chloroquine plus zinc has an effect (https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200… ) (although on checking this link before posting shows it has a problem. Who knows what is real?). That apparently came partly from Turkey, and Turkey claims to have been successful with HCQ (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/hydroxychloroquine-coronavirus-covid-19-treatment-turkey/)  If so, the effectiveness in other trials might depend on the diet. Why would zinc have any chance? The chloroquine structure has three nitrogen atoms more or less focused in one direction. Zinc has an affinity for nitrogen, and tries to form octahedral ligands. What that means is, if the chloroquine or derivative can take zinc up to the virus, it has a strong affinity for more amine functions, and could well bind to a nucleobase. If so, the RNA could not reproduce. This produces a hypothesis that has a causal basis and may comply with the data, but only if we had a zinc analysis for all nutrients taken by the patients. Further, it will not work once the virus takes a certain hold because it would be unsafe to put enough zinc into the patient to have a chance.

This example shows in part how difficult science can be, not helped by the likes of The Lancet item. The short answer, in my opinion, is we cannot be sure what works, and hydroxychloroquine probably is at best a means of reducing the virus load and letting the body recover if it can, but then is that not desirable? It would also be helpful if people would stop poresenting false of grossly incomplete information. Maybe one of these days we shall know what works and what doesn’t, but probably not very quickly.

Materials that Remember their Original Design

Recall in the movie Terminator 2 there was this robot that could turn into a liquid then return to its original shape and act as if it were solid metal. Well, according to Pu Zhang at Binghampton University in the US, something like that has been made, although not quite like the evil robot. What he has made is a solid that acts like a metal that, with sufficient force, can be crushed or variously deformed, then brought back to its original shape spontaneously by warming.

The metal part is a collection of small pieces of Field’s alloy, an alloy of bismuth, indium and tin. This has the rather unusual property of melting at 62 degrees Centigrade, which is the temperature reached by fairly warm water. The pieces have to be made with flat faces of the desired shape so that they effectively lock themselves together and it is this locking that at least partially gives the body its strength. The alloy pieces are then coated with a silicone shell using a process called conformal coating, a technique used to coat circuit boards to protect them from the environment and the whole is put together with 3D printing. How the system works (assuming it does) is that when force is applied that would crush or variously deform the fabricated object, as the metal pieces get deformed, the silicone coating gets stretched. The silicone is an elastomer, so as it gets stretched, just like a rubber band, it stores energy. Now, if the object is warmed the metal melts and can flow. At this point, like a rubber band let go, the silicone restores everything to the original shape, the when it cools the metal crystallizes and we are back where we started.

According to Physics World Zhang and his colleagues made several demonstration structures such as a honeycomb, a spider’s web-like structure and a hand, these were all crushed, and when warmed they sprang back to life in their original form. At first sight this might seem to be designed to put panel beaters out of business. You have a minor prang but do not worry: just get out the hair drier and all will be well. That, of course, is unlikely. As you may have noticed, one of the components is indium. There is not a lot of indium around and for its currently very restricted uses it costs about $US800/kg, which would make for a rather expensive bumper. Large-scale usage would make the cost astronomical. The cost of manufacturing would also always limit its use to rather specialist objects, irrespective of availabiity.One of the uses advocated by Zhang is in space missions. While weight has to be limited on space missions, volume is also a problem, especially for objects with awkward shapes, such as antennae or awkward shaped superstructures. The idea is they could be crushed down to a flat compact load for easy storage, then reassembled. The car bumper might be out of bounds because of cost and limited indium supply, but the cushioning effect arising from its ability to absorb a considerable amount of energy might be useful in space missions. Engineers usually use aluminium or steel for cushioning parts, but they are single use. A spacecraft with such landing cushions can be used once, but landing cushions made of this material could be restored simply by heating them. Zhang seems to favour the use in space engineering. He says he is contemplating building a liquid robot, but there is one thing, apart from behaviour, that such a robot could not do that the terminator robot did, and that is, if the robot has bits knocked off and the bits melt, they cannot reassemble into a whole. Leaving aside the fact there is no force to rejoin the bits, the individual bits will merely reassemble into whatever parts they were and cannot rejoin with the other bits. Think of it as held together by millions of rubber bands. Breaking into bits breaks a fraction of the rubber bands, which leaves no force to restore the original shape at the break.

A Spanner in the Cosmological Works

One of the basic assumptions in Einstein’s relativity is that the laws of physics are constant throughout the Universe. One of those laws is gravity, and an odd thing about gravity is that matter always attracts other matter, so why doesn’t everything simply collapse and fall to one gigantic mass? Einstein “explained” that with a “cosmological constant” which was really an ad hoc term put there to stop that happening. Then in 1927 Georges Lemaȋtre, a Belgian priest proposed that the Universe started off as a tiny incredibly condensed state that expanded, and is still expanding –  the so-called “Big Bang”. Hubble then found that on a sufficiently large scale, everything is moving away from the rest, and it was possible to extrapolate back in time to see when it all started. This was not universally agreed until the cosmic microwave background, which is required by this theory, was detected, and detected more or less in the required form. All was well, until eventually, three “problems” were perceived to arise: the “Horizon problem”, the “Flatness problem”, and the “Magnetic monopole problem”.

The Horizon problem is that on a sufficiently large scale, everything looks the same. The problem is, things are moving away from each other at such great distances, so how did they come into thermal equilibrium when there was no contact between them? I must confess I do not understand this. If the initial mass is a ball of uniform but incredibly dense energy, then if it is uniform, and if the expansion is uniform, everything that happens follows common rate equations, so to get the large-scale uniformity, all you need is the uniform expansion of the energy and a common clock. If particle A wants to decay, surely it does not have to get permission from the other side of the Universe. The flatness problem is that the Universe seems to behave as if it followed Euclidean geometry. In the cosmological models, this requires a certain specific particle density. The problem is, out of all the densities, why is it more or less exactly right? Is this reasoning circular, bearing in mind the models were constructed to give what we see? The cosmic microwave background is a strong indication that Euclidean geometry is correct, but maybe there are other models that might give this result with less difficulties. Finally, the magnetic monopole problem is we cannot find magnetic monopoles. In this context, so far all electromagnetism is in accord with Maxwell’s electromagnetic theory and its equations exclude magnetic monopoles. Maybe we can’t find them because the enthusiasts who argue they should be there are wrong.

Anyway, around 1980, Alan Guth introduced a theory called inflation that would “solve” these problems. In this, within 10^-36 seconds after the big bang (that is 1 second of time divided by10 multiplied by itself 36 times) the Universe made a crazy expansion from almost no volume to something approaching what we see now by 10^-32 seconds after the big bang, then everything slowed down and we get what we have now – a tolerably slowly expanding Universe but with quantum fluctuations that led to the galaxies, etc that we see today. This theory “does away” with these problems. Mind you, not everyone agrees. The mathematician Roger Penrose has pointed out that this inflation requires extremely specific initial conditions, so not only has this moved the problem, but it made it worse. Further, getting a flat universe with these mathematics is extremely improbable. Oops.

So, to the spanner. Scientists from UNSW Sydney reported that measurements on light from a quasar 13 billion light years away found that the fine structure constant was, er, not exactly constant. The fine structure constant α is

α=e2/2εoch

The terms are e the elementary electric charge, εo is the permittivity of free space, c is the sped of light, and h is Planck’s constant, or the quantum of action. If you don’t understand the details, don’t worry. The key point is α is a number (a shade over 137) and is a ratio of the most important constants in electromagnetic theory. If that is not constant, it means all of fundamental physics is not constant.  No only that, but in one direction, the strength of the electric force appeared to increase, but in the opposite direction, decrease. Not only that but a team in the US made observations about Xrays from distant galaxies, and found directionality as well, and even more interesting, their directional axis was essentially the same as the Australian findings. That appears to mean the Universe is dipolar, which means the basic assumption underpinning relativity is not exactly correct, while all those mathematical gymnastics to explain some difficult “problems” such as the horizon problem are irrelevant because they have concluded how something occurred that actually didn’t. Given that enthusiasts do not give up easily I expect soon there will be a deluge of papers explaining why it had tp be dipolar.

Ebook discount

From May 27 – June 3, Ranh, the fifth in a series  but written largely as a stand-alone, will be discounted to 99c/99p on Amazon. The Scaevola series is linked through one character (Scaevola) following a quest. Ranh is the name given to a planet fictionally orbiting Epsilon Eridani, a star that is only 900 My old, and hence has not had time to develop life beyond the anaerobic bacteria level. However, 67 million years ago, some alien transported Cretaceous life from Earth and it has evolved to a space faring civilization. Because life was clearly “created”, since there are no fossils older than 67 My, the civilization is a theocracy. Some human has sent a message back in time, and this has been interpreted by a Cardinal that received it as a divine order to clear the planet of ultimate creation, (Earth) of those pesky mammals. A small delegation has arrived from Earth to negotiate a peace treaty. But how can negotiations persuade the deeply religious to ignore a divine order? A tale of plotting, conspiracy, religious fervour, murder, treachery, honour, diplomacy, and tail-ball.

After Lockdown, Now What?

A number of countries are emerging from lockdown and New Zealand is in the select group in which there are very few new cases, and indeed we have days in which no new cases are recorded. Now comes the damage. The Economist ran an article that summarized what happened in China following the release of lockdown. Rides on public transport are down by a third, restaurants have 40% fewer clients, and hotel stays are a third of normal. Bankruptcies may be up to 20%. People are still wary, either of the virus or their wallet.

It is one thing to open shops, but another thing to get people to go to them and buy stuff. If the disease is still around, while some will take the risk, many others will not, although on this front, in NZ shops initially had huge days. It is not totally bad for those shops that can last the distance because for many things provided people have the money, they will still buy the same amount, other than, perhaps luxury consumables. However, the question then is, will they still have money? Different countries will have different problems here. Apparently in Europe a fifth of the labor force are in special schemes where the state pays their wages, but that presumably, cannot go on indefinitely. In NZ, after a week following lockdown, the jury is still out. People are working, but are they becoming wary?

In New Zealand, the State offered wage assistance to companies that had their income reduced by 30% due to the lockdown, which was a lot, but a number of companies, including the airlines, shed a lot of staff because it was obvious they were not going to operate at anywhere near their previous level. Airlines create a rather unusual situation: pilots rightly earn a lot of money, so would they be prepared to share work with another pilot, each at half-pay? The company keeps pilots on its books for when things improve, and most importantly for the pilots, they keep their minimum required flying hours up to date. That approach won’t work for low-paid workers. But then airlines may not have much work anyway. Here, there has to be social distancing. The passengers may at last get reasonable leg room (Yay!) but either ticket prices increase sharply or the airline realizes there is no point in losing money with half-full planes through social distancing.  The simplest way to raise ticket prices is to cut out the “specials”, so designed to fill aircraft. If the expensive ones with a small markup still sell, the airline may remain viable. So what should the pilots do? The question then comes down to predicting the future.

Herein lies the problem: most people will have choices, and those who more correctly accommodate themselves to whatever happens prosper. Those who make unfortunate choices, or worse, bad choices, will suffer. Governments also have choices, and they tend to be influenced by the next election, which in our case is this year. Propping up zombie companies is bad for the economy, but mass unemployment is bad for votes. What will happen? The pandemic will uncover some scabs in our society. Here, half of our deaths came from badly run rest homes. My guess is the biggest economic price will be paid by the poor, or the small business owner who is joining the poor. Furthermore, governments may still not be able to stem the downturn. In New Zealand, the Government announced a big spend-up in infrastructure, and shortly afterwards the biggest construction and civil engineering company shed 10% of its staff.

What happens to globalization? What most people do not realize is how interconnected the world economy is. As an example, Boeing assembles aircraft, but the parts come from a wide-ranging source. For a Rolls Royce motor, it too will depend on parts from a wide range of sources. If any of these sources break down because of the pandemic, there will be a problem. Equally, with a great reduction in international flights, maybe Boeing will stop buying when it can’t sell. Widespread unemployment could cascade out. Meanwhile, selected industries will clamour to their governments for bail-outs. There will be a cry for protectionism, without realizing how much “local” industry depends on elsewhere.The odd thing is, we now have a rather unique chance to shape the future. Can we do it sensibly? And what, really, is sensible? And how do you prevent the spoils, such as they are, going to the already super rich?